employer strategies

This term refers to patterns of employers' decision-making regarding work organization within firms (for example forms of control over labour, job structures, and payment systems). Originally developed within Marxism to refer to employers' responses to capital-labour conflicts, it is currently used in the labour process and labour -market segmentation literatures to stress the agency (or intervention) of employers in a supposedly impersonal labour-market, and the variety in their forms of decision-making.

Dictionary of sociology. 2013.

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